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Looks very similar to my leak, underneath the spare wheel tray lead straight to the rear seating area. Once here the water filled the whole section and then over spilled into the rear foot wells.

A shame I can't/don't know how to post videos as I gad to use an air gun and wet & dry vac to remove the water from the reservoir under the rear seats.!

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Yes! Your pictures are what led me here. I understand from your post that the drain hose was kinked. But where was your water intrusion coming from? Did that kink nick the tubing or was the source further down from that point, further up...?
 

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Yes! Your pictures are what led me here. I understand from your post that the drain hose was kinked. But where was your water intrusion coming from? Did that kink nick the tubing or was the source further down from that point, further up...?
From what I could make out the near side rear (uk near side) kinked drain hose was causing water (and debris) to leak from the drain hose fitting near the pano roof and then down through the headliner and rear quarter panel into the area of the boot near the rear light fitting (similar to yours whereby there's a water/tide mark and debris stains in the boot itself).

When the headliner was down the right hand side was completely dry but the left was saturated. As a check I removed the near side pipe from the drain rubber near the light switch and this was dry... even inserting a smaller pipe a good 12 inches inside from the bottom gave no water/dirt. Once disconnected from the piano roof joint however (with the kink still in place) I could tip the pipe back towards myself standing near the rear bumper and filthy water/small debris came out. When blowing compressed air down the pipe, it just blew strain back again. Once the kink was straightened I could then blow air all the way down to the drain rubber.

As someone else has done I cut a larger exit hole on the drain rubber (all 4) as they do look like they can block very easily.

On another raise note the near side front pillar was also damp and I wondered if this joint was leaking too, however it was quite difficult to remove the hose from the fitting in the roof and air was easily blown down this hose. As we sometime park on a camber whereby the near side is lower than the offside, I just put it down to the rear leaking badly and during a heavy downpour (we got loads last season) any water from the near side rear fitting was just running along the frame and down the front pillar.

Touch would, everything is still dry today and the fix spears to doing its job.

I honestly couldn't believe the amount of water stored under the rear seats, it's just like a separate water tank... if you can blow air down any of the holes near the suspension spring covers!! under the seats, it was like a geezer!!! On mine where water was sloshing around and jumping out of any other hole available. Looking closer, there are also holes on the front of this area (near where the back of your knees would be when sitting)... I fathomed than every time the car was facing downhill or when braking, water was gradually coming from these holes and straight into the carpet underlay. Over time this and even when the level was a t a certain height the under last was just acting like a huge sponge.

I hope this helps in some way.

Cheers
 

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Now that I have half my interior strewn across my driveway, I determined the “snafu” to be a hose disconnect from the passenger rear drain behind the wheel well. Aargh! Blew through both rear tubes and they’re clear. Time to silicone both sides to the drain plugs and start getting the cargo area back together.
 

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Way to go Mike!!! :)
 

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:gathering:
 

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Hello! I'm having issues with 2009 Tiguan. I assume it is from the sunroof. The ceiling above the back seat passenger side gets wet with heavy rain. From reading, I am assuming that a drain hole is clogged. I am just not sure how to find the rear drain holes to check? Does the glass need to be removed? (Is that even possible?). I also couldn't find where the drain comes out under the car in the rear. I saw the diagram at the top of this thread but it didn't help me. I'm a total car novice! Thank you for any and all help!
 

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Have to remove the headliner to access the rear most drains.
 

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My 2015 TDI has just experienced this notorious drain tube leak issue with the right rear drain tube. After pulling both of the rear side panels, I discovered the boffins at VW Factory had pinched the tube between where the side panel clips to the metal work. It still drains, but just barely. However over time it had developed a hair-line split which was the source of the leak.

I took it in to see if VW would offer any good will, and despite their mechanic confirming it was an obvious factory defect, I was told the 2-year warranty has passed - so basically tough luck. 13-Euro later I have a new tube to install. This time around I'll use some cloth-electrical tape to secure the tube to the electrical harness just enough to keep it out of the way when I reinstall the panel.

Interior side panels removed for inspection -

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Pinched tube right where the panel snaps into place -

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Looking up from inside the side panels -

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Connection to the drain valve where water exits the vehicle -

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Closer inspection of the tube connection and headliner didn't show any water getting in from here -

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Tube removed just to check that it's not blocked since this drain can not be accessed from outside the vehicle -

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This is the upper side panel clip responsible for the damage -

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Cleaning the Drain Tubes -

For anyone who needs to clean the drain tubes, I found these cheap metal drinking straw brushes work pretty well. The two rear lower drain valves are relatively easy to get to from under the car. However the AdBlue tank does get in the way of the right rear so you can tape it to a metal coat hanger to get the extra length. Get under the car and insert the brush into the black drain valve and run it in and out a few times. You don't really need to jam it up the tube as any mud, dirt or debris will collect at this point.

For the two front tubes, I've used a 3-mm diameter weed wacker trimmer line about 2 meters in length. Simply run it down the two front tubes openings from the top of the sunroof. Be careful and don't force anything as you don't want to separate the drain valve from the tube! The front tubes exit inside the plenum and are a bit difficult to see. Once you think you have them cleared, close the sun roof and use a water bottle and pour some water into the sun roof drain channels and verify the water flows out of the vehicle at each corner.

You can find these metal drinking straw brushed in the cheap stores for a few Euros -

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With the drain valve removed, you can get a sense of the size of the brush compared to the drain valve and drain tube.
These little brushed are just the right size and fit perfectly!


Gas Engineering Space space shuttle Gadget
 

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Follow up on the repair installation -

I picked up my parts from VW today, so I've detailed what was required to do the installation. Actually, getting the new hose routed into the body work wasn't as difficult as I expected. Getting the panels back on was more of an effort TBO!

Removing the old tube -

The new hose has a different part number, and is longer than the OEM tube. However it seems this is intentional so it can fit multiple vehicles. In order to check your work, a smartphone camera comes in handy as most of the fittings and holes you need to work with can not be easily seen or reached.

To remove the old tube, start at the top and disconnect it from the sunroof. Note the clip at the rear of the air bag system - it will not come off - so just lift the tube off and out of the clip. The second clip is about half way down behind the lower panel and is attached to the edge of one of the openings. This clip should be removed and saved it as you'll use it again.

Now reach into the bottom end and disconnect the drain tube it from the drain valve. With the drain tube out of the way, remove the black rubber drain valve; it takes a bit of a pull, but it will come free.

Installing the new tube -

Rather than cutting it to length first, just slice off the plastic end fitting on the bottom end (it's not intended for the Tiguan) and cut the end at an angle so it's pointed. This will make it easier to fit through the opening in the metal work. Starting from the top opening, feed the pointed end down, into the metal work. There's a small opening you have to contend with (see pictures) but the pointed end of the tube should make it easier to get it through.

Once the tube has been correctly routed, connect the top plastic fitting to the sunroof and then feed all the extra length through the opening where the drain valve was located. This will allow you to get the correct length and accommodate any slack. Before you mark the tube for cutting, you may want to secure it to the electrical harness near the panel clip so it's out of the way as this will help avoid crushing the tube.

With the tube extended all the way through the opening in the bottom, use a Sharpie or other marker, and reach into the lower section mark the location of where the tube exits the hole. Add an extra 10mm for good measure, and cut the tube square. Fit the drain valve to the end and make sure it's properly seated. Then secure it back into the hole. Use your camera to verify it's seated properly and also look up from under the car to make sure the seal is seated correctly.

Once all that's done it's just a matter of installing all the panels. Be sure to check each panel for the metal clips as some may have remained in the metal work when you pulled them off or may have broken completely.

OEM replacement drain tubes have different part numbers than the factory fitted ones. The replacement tube is about 40cm longer and has a plastic bottom fitting on the end that's not used on the Tiguan -

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Cut off the bottom end fitting so the tube has a sharp point to it as it will make it easier to fit it through the hole in the metal work -

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New drain tube routed down through the metal work. Note there is an opening in this location which you'll have to feed the tube through. The image insert shows the hole looking up from below. By cutting the end of the tube to a point, I found it was easier to get it through this opening -

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Attach the drain tube fitting to the sun roof drain opening, it should "snap" into place. Reposition the tube into the retaining clip (right) -

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Secure the tube with cloth electrical tape to avoid pinching it when the panel is installed -

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With the black rubber drain valve removed, feed the remaining drain tube through the hole and mark with a pen to determine where to cut to length -

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Fit the drain valve onto the end of the drain tube and re-seat the drain valve back into the hole from inside the vehicle. You should be able to feel if it's inserted correctly. You can use a phone-camera to check your work and also look up from under the vehicle to make sure the seal is correct.

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Connect the clip to the hose and attach to the metal work -

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Now reinstall all the panels. Check to be sure all the clips are present and not left in the metal work, lost or broken -

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Excellent DYI instructions supported by great pics. 👍 👍
 

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I FINALLY got this fixed on my 09 Tiguan. I thought it was the spout leaking at the joint between the sunroof drain and the tube, so I re-glued that a couple of years ago with marine adhesive. In a recent storm we saw it still leaking :mad: .

I finally decided to figure it out once and for all. I bought a long bendy pipe cleaner on Amazon. Threaded it into the tube, and...got it stuck. FML. After really yanking on it, I got it and a little dirt out of the tube. But went to blow into the tube to clear out the dust, and...nothing. I couldn't blow through it. I had never thought to check to see if it was actually a BLOCKAGE causing the leak and not a little hole or misalignment. The gears started turning and I realized I could still be experiencing leaks in the sunroof as the tube fills up with water, then the roof rack channels fill up with water, and the water spills OVER the top of the roof rack assembly into the car ceiling. UGH.

So I have a blocked tube, and it's already watertight since I fixed it. Onto the work I wish I had thought to do years ago.

I followed the drain line down the A pillar, behind the dash, and pulled out the dash panel to reveal the end of the drain. Follow along in pictures.
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You can see the tube goes into a "collector" or drain end that directs it through the firewall (and eventually behind the wheel well liner).

I yanked out the collector and saw this:

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It felt heavy, and I found out that was because it was full of what I can only describe as a clod of dirt.

That's likely due to the fact that the drain end has a tiny little "x" shaped opening that allows it to get COMPLETELY clogged. Seriously?!

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I emptied it out and then cut the end of the collector off to allow larger particles to get through (Why VW decided that only water should be able to exit the drain pipe is absolutely beyond me, but I would imagine that a large portion of the people experiencing leak problems with their sunroofs are actually seeing this issue). I put it back into the hole, threaded the line into it, and made sure there were no kinks.

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I did the same thing on the driver's side. I poured a couple of gallons of water through the system with the roof open (carefully to avoid it going in the drivers seat) and closed. Works like a charm. The nice thing is if this is happening on your car, taking out that trim panel is a LOT easier than getting to the roof drain behind the ceiling panel - maybe even a better starting point. Shame it took 4 years to figure it out. And shame VW decided that this was a sane design decision :(. I'm thinking about moving to the Pacific NW just to get some more mileage out of this fix.
This is the SOLUTION, I was so frustrated, until I saw this. It took me like 2-3 hours to fix the 4 drain pipes. "The ones in the back are accessible from the trunk sides, next to the liftgate there is the blue whose".
Thanks for this tip!
 
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