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I've heard that the previous 2.0FSI(197hp) in the mk5 GTI's are prone to getting carbon build up after a number of miles. Now I'm hearing the 2.0TSI has the same problem. Should I be putting additives in? Should I be worried at all? Also do you HAVE to run premium(91 octane in Canada)? The salesman said the ECU will recognize the grade of fuel (85 at least) and adjust the timing so the engine can run smoothly with downgraded power and efficiency but it may gum up the combustion chamber. Is this true?
 

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ALL direct injections suffer form carbon buildup on the intake valves. This is because all the detergents in the gasoline never get to wash down the buildup. Adding anything to your gas will only lighten your wallet, not clean the valves. What the salesman told you is almost correct. Using 85 octane will force the engine to retard timing and reduce power. It will also force you to consume more fuel to get going. Using anything below 91 is false economy. The engine will run, but not efficiently. The fuel door should say min 91. Who do you believe, the people that made the car, or the sales guy with little training?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ALL direct injections suffer form carbon buildup on the intake valves. This is because all the detergents in the gasoline never get to wash down the buildup. Adding anything to your gas will only lighten your wallet, not clean the valves. What the salesman told you is almost correct. Using 85 octane will force the engine to retard timing and reduce power. It will also force you to consume more fuel to get going. Using anything below 91 is false economy. The engine will run, but not efficiently. The fuel door should say min 91. Who do you believe, the people that made the car, or the sales guy with little training?
I completely agree. I didn't really trust my salesman. When I was in the buying process, he said the car had "240hp" and "only needs regular fuel" and "comes with a blockheater". I couldn't trust him or the sales manager because they kept loading me with false info. I looked up everything online before I bought so I wasn't conned into his lies. But anyways, is there anything I can do to keep it running clean?
 

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A block heater will not help to keep it clean. The best thing to do is run 91, not 85. And at some point in the future, you will have to deal with the carbon build up and get it cleaned. The other part of issue is that blowby from the crankcase gets sucked back into the intake. this does have some oil in it and that adds to the mess sticking to the hot intake valves. I have installed a catch can that is claimed to reduce the issue. Some claim it works, some claim it doesn't. I can't say because I have not boroscoped the intake to see. The other downside is that is has to be manually emptied. In our winters, every 2 weeks. I can bring it inside and do that in the comfort of the shop. Doing it outside would not be fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
A block heater will not help to keep it clean. The best thing to do is run 91, not 85. And at some point in the future, you will have to deal with the carbon build up and get it cleaned. The other part of issue is that blowby from the crankcase gets sucked back into the intake. this does have some oil in it and that adds to the mess sticking to the hot intake valves. I have installed a catch can that is claimed to reduce the issue. Some claim it works, some claim it doesn't. I can't say because I have not boroscoped the intake to see. The other downside is that is has to be manually emptied. In our winters, every 2 weeks. I can bring it inside and do that in the comfort of the shop. Doing it outside would not be fun.
Oh I know a blockheater won't keep it clean, its just something my salesman said it had, and then later on I found out it didn't have. Anyways I have been running 91 since the beginning. And do you know how long until I have to de-carbon it? I've heard seafoaming will work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Did it have a " block heater "
Nope! I talked to another salesman and she said that they test them in -40c in Germany. If they start, they will send them without a blockheater to North America. I asked if they would install one if I payed, no such luck. I think I'll have to go aftermarket because I want the confirmation my car will start in very cold temperatures. The Tiguan is the only VW in Canada to not have a block heater.
 

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For carbon build up, I would not worry until you get poor performance and or rough idle. I am at 80K and running fine. As to your sales guy, he sure knows how to talk (polite way of saying spew BS). For heaters, there are aftermarket options like stick on pan heaters. Even an electric battery blanket would work well. i personally don't like a block heater because of the high cost to run it. Other alternative work just as well.
 

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The Tiguan is the only VW in Canada to not have a block heater.
And just think of Winterpeg (Winnipeg, Manitoba for others) where it's not uncommon to have two block heaters installed. What the heck would they do??? :roll:
 

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The diesel powered Tigs in Scandinavia can have a diesel fuelled preheater fitted that I think even has a timer. Not sure how it works exactly but I think it warms the whole vehicle. Can't think why there isn't some alternative option for petrol powered models though.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
And just think of Winterpeg (Winnipeg, Manitoba for others) where it's not uncommon to have two block heaters installed. What the heck would they do??? :roll:
Tell me about it! I was just there a week ago(with my Tiguan, I averaged 27mpg in -25c) and drove from Calgary. Terrible driving conditions going there. One day it got down to -41 without the windchill, the Tiguan said. My phone said -38 but I was on the outskirts of Winnipeg. Tiguan took a bit to start, but it did it with no booster cables or anything! But one day it got down to -51 and my cousin had her Corolla plugged in, she tried to start it(with a battery charger on quick start) and it just cranked and did nothing. She unplugged the block heater but the cord snapped right in half. I'm glad I dont live in mid Canada. I still wish it had a blockheater!
 

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... Who do you believe, the people that made the car, or the sales guy with little training?
I know it's off topic, but we researched the cars we browsed, including the Tiguan. It amazed me that all of them took the time to show and explain the very pedestrian features that are common place but not one used an individual vehicle's unique features as selling points.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
And just think of Winterpeg (Winnipeg, Manitoba for others) where it's not uncommon to have two block heaters installed. What the heck would they do??? :roll:
Old Dog, do you have a block heater on your Tiggy?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I know it's off topic, but we researched the cars we browsed, including the Tiguan. It amazed me that all of them took the time to show and explain the very pedestrian features that are common place but not one used an individual vehicle's unique features as selling points.
The reason you'd buy a Tiguan is NOT because of the features, but because of its upscale interior, quality exterior, good looks, ability to compete with cars 10k under and 20k over its price point , and driver involvement. No car in the class, (Escape, Rav4, CR-V, X3, Q5 etc.) do not include HALF of what I listed. The Tiguan isn't the biggest in the class(I do miss my previous Mitsu Outlander for cargo room) but you still get great rear legroom, peppy motor, decent mpg's, and fun to drive character. I was a bit nervous for reliability, but that's going away now. I love my Tig!
 

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Old Dog, do you have a block heater on your Tiggy?
No, I don't bc7. So far so good, but the darn weather conditions we all have been experiencing recently like -29°C here with the wind chill this morning are making me grateful we have a garage to house it when not in use.

Keep warm!
 

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The diesel powered Tigs in Scandinavia can have a diesel fuelled preheater fitted that I think even has a timer. Not sure how it works exactly but I think it warms the whole vehicle. Can't think why there isn't some alternative option for petrol powered models though.

Cheers
I think it is similar to the Mercedes Benz and it is not warming the whole vehicle. On the ML350 Bluetec, there is a warming diesel light on the dashboard when starting the car in cold weather. The light runs for about 30 seconds and the car can start without problem.
 

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…. I have installed a catch can that is claimed to reduce the issue. Some claim it works, some claim it doesn't. I can't say because I have not boroscoped the intake to see. The other downside is that is has to be manually emptied…. .
Hey Shawn, which catch can did you get, I was thinking the same last weekend I replaced the fine air/oil separator on the valve cover as part of troubleshooting my OBD codes.
 

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I bought the Forge one right after it came out. It does work well, but needed modification to better suit our environment. In the winter it needs to be drained every 2 weeks, The original design calls for it to be removed and drained, NOT! I installed a hose and drain valve at the bottom of the splash pan, so all I have to do is reach in to the hole, open a valve and drain. I chose this one because it eliminated the stock PCV. There is beauty in simplicity.
 

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I bought the Forge one right after it came out. It does work well, but needed modification to better suit our environment. In the winter it needs to be drained every 2 weeks, The original design calls for it to be removed and drained, NOT! I installed a hose and drain valve at the bottom of the splash pan, so all I have to do is reach in to the hole, open a valve and drain. I chose this one because it eliminated the stock PCV. There is beauty in simplicity.
Do you mind telling us how much oil the catch can collected every two weeks?
 

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ALL direct injections suffer form carbon buildup on the intake valves. This is because all the detergents in the gasoline never get to wash down the buildup. Adding anything to your gas will only lighten your wallet, not clean the valves. What the salesman told you is almost correct. Using 85 octane will force the engine to retard timing and reduce power. It will also force you to consume more fuel to get going. Using anything below 91 is false economy. The engine will run, but not efficiently. The fuel door should say min 91. Who do you believe, the people that made the car, or the sales guy with little training?
After 54000ks I just had the engine light come on and it turns out it was not carbon build up, but a motor that controls a set of flaps failed as a result.
Got it replaced, whole new manifold, but not as costly as I'd been led to think by some online sources.
Carbon is indeed common in all direct injection engines and the RONs came up on the first service, we've only ever used 98.

They also have a tip that may help.

Carbon build up is inevitable and sportier driving tactics will delay serious build up for a little while longer.

They likened it to mud in a pipe, the slower the material moves the more gunk can be deposited. Conversely, the faster the material moves the less gunk can be deposited.

They recommended checking the carbon situation every 20-40000ks. Only costs a few hundred to take a sticky beak.
 
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