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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I’m not sure if this is the right forum. Please point me in the right direction if needed.

I’ve noticed that the internal lights flicker and the headlight put out yellowish light.

Could it be an issue with the battery and the alternator?

Mine is a 2014 Tiguan S which according to VW has seen very good maintenance so looking for options.

Should I change the battery and alternator?
 

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Start by changing the bulbs. If they are original 2014 bulbs they are just going out. Halogens fade to yellow before going out. I replace my halogen with Night breaker H7s which are nice and bright and last about 2 years before needing changed again
 
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Volvo XC40, formerly 2015 match 177ps 4mo DSG
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To answer the second part of your question, unlikely. The usual symptom of battery/voltage in these cars is features stop working properly and random warning lights. It's all controlled by distributed control modules and they're more susceptible to low voltage than the lights.
 
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In a word, no. In more words ( :) ) legal, fitting, and light pattern. The light from a bulb comes from a very precise point, and is the focus of the reflector. So the light beam is precise and accurate, and not glaring. LED replacement bulbs do not have this precise point of light source so the pattern when fitted to regulate light housings is scattered and produces a poor light pattern and a lot of glare. Because if this in most countries they are also not legal to fit.

Then there's fitting: Many have a large heatsink at the back so do not easily fit inside the light unit. There is limited space anyway between the battery and light fitting. And then there's canbus, the car regularly tests the lights, not enough to turn them on, but enough to confirm the filament is intact. The replacement units need to be able to respond to this interrogation, otherwise your dash will show headlight failure.

There are several very good and bright 'night breaker' or similar regular bulbs on the market, and these give an excellent increase in light and beam length. I've used them in seversl previous cars before getting xenon and now LED, they'll do what you want, and are much less hassle.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
In a word, no. In more words ( :) ) legal, fitting, and light pattern. The light from a bulb comes from a very precise point, and is the focus of the reflector. So the light beam is precise and accurate, and not glaring. LED replacement bulbs do not have this precise point of light source so the pattern when fitted to regulate light housings is scattered and produces a poor light pattern and a lot of glare. Because if this in most countries they are also not legal to fit.

Then there's fitting: Many have a large heatsink at the back so do not easily fit inside the light unit. There is limited space anyway between the battery and light fitting. And then there's canbus, the car regularly tests the lights, not enough to turn them on, but enough to confirm the filament is intact. The replacement units need to be able to respond to this interrogation, otherwise your dash will show headlight failure.

There are several very good and bright 'night breaker' or similar regular bulbs on the market, and these give an excellent increase in light and beam length. I've used them in seversl previous cars before getting xenon and now LED, they'll do what you want, and are much less hassle.
Thank you!
 
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